Deck

 

 

Stern Rail

The stern pinrail consists of 5 pieces of 100 high oak.
The two long side pinrails are fixed to 5 bulwark posts, 300mm up from the deck. Their stern ends are cut back where they touch the shaped outer stern posts.
A wide transom piece is fixed into cut outs on the 4 transom posts.
The sides are joined to the transom with curved infils. Holes are drilled for fixings, main sheet traveller supports, deck eyes and belay pins.

Stern Pinrail
Stern Pinrail

 
Link to drawing in pdf


 

Seat

The seat was made thicker from 4mm Luran as it was the thinnest I could get it planned.
The underside of the seat ends were notched to fit the oak seat supports (the supports were made first to the plans) This also kept the two side pinrails against the bulwark posts during construction.
To the right of the seat support, you can see the black tube used to feed the tiller rope down through the deck.

Seat


 

Main sheeting

The main sheets are feed below deck via a pipe in the seat supports. This is made from 4mm mahogany. The pipe is 3.2dia x 150mm soft copper (KS 1213 1/8" fuel tube) as this can be easily bent to shape without deforming so restricting the sheeting cord

Main sheet tube inside seat support


 

Boom Support

The boom support was made to the drawing. The nearest size of square brass tube was 10mm down from the surveyed dimensions which is visually not apparent.
It was luck that 2 brass angles exactly replicated the channel. The frame was brazed for strenght. The angles were taped to a 7mm block of wood held vertically. A square tube was held vertical in a jig and brazed. The second tube was then held in the jig and checked to be parrallel to the first with a card template before brazing.
The frame was then laid horizontally and the angled tube brazed so the edged were in line. A card template was used to get the angles correct. They got burnt as well as the jig.

The Pivot brackets were cut from a large sheet as no comparable strips were available. The 1,6mm holes were drill befroe cutting for convenience. The verticals were brazed and the cross strip soldered. This was because it was extremely difficult the jig all four parts at once.
The different melting points of brazing/soldering is one of the advantages of brazing.

Boom support fabrication

The deck positioning was slightly aft of the designed position as it had to clear the tiller when it was folded flat.

Boom support Up and down

 
Link to drawing in pdf


 

Shroud Irons

The slots for the shroud irons had already ben made through the deck before making the bulwarks. It was now necessary to make the slots through the bulwark rail.
A dummy mast was made and tilted aft using a plumbline and a piece of card cut to the correct angle. A piece of cord was fixed to the top of the mast at the height of the crosstrees. The other end was passed through the deck slot and pulled tight. The position of the slot was then drawn on the bulwark rail and cut out with a drill and file.

Shroud irons production

The shroud iron was made from 1.6 x 6 x 150mm brass strip (KS245 1/16"x1/4"), 3dia brass tube (KS127 5/32") inside a 4dia x 6mm brass tube (KS128 5/32").
 
A jig was made to braze the large tube to the strip. The strip was pushed gently against the tube to hold it in place. The Macro Torch did not give enough heat to get the thick strip hot enough. My plumber's torch solved the problem allowing me to braze the joint quickly on both sides.

Shroud irons production

The photo shows the stages of fabrication. Braze the large tube, cut off the tube, mark out, cut tube back both sides, glue small tube into large tube with instant glue, cut off excess small tube, file all edges and drill hole.

Shroud irons production
Shroud irons production


 

Shroud Pinrails

The shroud pinrails were made from oak shaped to the drawing.

Shroud pinrail
Shroud pinrail


 

Tiller

The tiller was carved from a piece of oak kitchen light pelmet. I measured the actual tiller during survey and drew a card template to scale. The tiller movement is determined by the angle of the rudder stock so at either ends of travel the tiller is actually touching the seat by the bulwark rail. Several card templates were made, checking their shape against photo before getting the best shape.
The tiller is glued (Araldite) to a 3mm rod which is glued to the brass rudde stock end. The hole in the brass was redrilled at an angle to get the tiller to touch the seat equi-distant to the bulwark rail.

Tiller templates
Tiller fabrication

The rudder is controlled by a rope tied around the tiller and then passed through the deck down tubes hidden by the seat, bulwark posts and pinrails. These a feed to a single servo. (see the seat pics above)
This simulates Jolie Brise. The hole is raised to get a straight pull on the rope at extreme tiller movements.

Tiller


 

Rudder

Rudder fabrication

The method of constructing the rudder was the same as used for the 1/20 model. A solid brass bar is located in the base of the keel with a pin. The top end is fixed to the tiller. This means the rudder blade can be easily removed by withdrawing the bar from the top. A close fitting brass tube is glued to a cutout in the top part of the keel to form a rudder stock tube.

Rudder fabrication

The rudder blade is made from three 6mm ply pieces. The middle one has a section removed to allow for the brass tube. The top of the blade was extended to form a tube as this part goes into the hull. The rudder blade is attached to the solid brass bar with screws passing through holes in the tube and bar.
The only problems incured this time were to get the bar aligned with the keel and the deck; The rudder rotation is restricted as the tiller hits the seat on full travel making is difficult to fit the screws.
The Unimat was used to accurately align the holes in the brass rod.
 

Link to drawing in pdf

 

Front Hatch

Front hatch construction sequence

A removable 4mm mahogany frame was made to fit in the deck before the planking was laid. It will be glued in once the deck planking is finished.
The hatch sides were made from 50 x 2mm spruce. There is no need to cut out the front of the hatch as Boards will be glued in. The corners were made from 6 x 2mm spruce.
 

Front hatch construction sequence

The bottom rails were made from 12 x 2mm spruce. The inside piece does not go down to the deck. The back corner pieces were cut to size.
 

Front hatch construction sequence

A cross peice was added to support the 12 x 2mm roof planking. Black card was used to simulated the tar joints.
 

Front hatch construction sequence

A piece of white card was used to support the 8 x 2mm sliding roof planking. It was laid on the hatch roof to get the correct curve.
3 x 1mm brass strip was Araldited to 4 x 4mm spruce rail. Masking tape was used to stop any Araldite getting on the wood and brass.
Top rails were added to the sides and back.
 

Front hatch construction sequence

Two spruce strips were cut to the curve shape of the roof and notched at both ends to fit under the brass strips. They were wedged in position for gluing on the roof planks. Part of the card was removed for gluing as the card could delaminate.
Two short lengths of 1mm brass rod were glued on with varnish to simulate hinges.
A thin strip was added to the front underside of the sliding roof to stop forward movement. A small pin was drilled through the hatch roof to stop the down movement.
 

Link to drawing in pdf


 

Rear Hatch

Rear hatch construction sequence

The rear hatch was made in the same way as the front hatch but with wooden sliding rails and removable hatch boards.
The hatches and skylights were attached to the raised decking by internals screws into triangluar corner pieces of 5mm spruce..
 

Link to drawing in pdf


 

Skylights and Instrument Pod

skylights construction sequence

Both the skylights were made in the same way. 4mm spruce was cut with mitred corners creating the basic shape. The instrument pod was made from three different thicknesses of pine shown below.
The opening skylights were false and made with the frame sides in one piece. Grooves were cut with a hacksaw to simulate the openings.

hatches and sklylights

skylights construction sequence

The 4 x 2mm spruce rails supporting the 1mm brass rods were drilled using my Unimat as a vertical drill. A jig was made so the holes were 6mm apart. The end rails were only drilled 1mm deep which was easily done as it was one turn of the wheel.

skylights construction sequence

hatches and sklylights

 
Link to drawing in pdf

Link to drawing in pdf


 

Winch


 
Link to drawing in pdf